In Season Now

If you are thinking of getting a better relationship with food, in general, the first thing you should do is; eating more seasonally. At first this might seem less important than other changes you could make like; eating less factory farmed meat, eating more whole foods or stop eating processed food. However the thing is, as soon as you start eating seasonally, you automatically do those things. If you eat according to season, most processed foods become, well, absent. It is not like we only get Oreos in winter or that in summer Ben and Jerry ice-cream is at its peak “ripeness”. Also I have never heard of chicken-season??

Isn’t that to complicated?? Remembering all those charts when what vegetable or fruit is season when and if you’re not able to do that, doing your groceries at your supermarket with one of those charts in your hand, checking with every food you put in your cart if it is or isn’t in season. I mean most of us do not have time or interest in such a thing. So how are you going to put this to practice? Here is where markets come in handy; when you go to your local market and head over to your fruit and vegetable stall, it is easy to spot what is in season, because that is what is abundantly and low-priced layed out. And what is not in season, will be either very hard to find or ridiculously expensive. No charts or grocery list needed, you just go and get what they have, easily done.

Eating seasonally will not only give you the most nutrient rich foods, but will also spark your creativity as you will have to change what you eat every few months. In weekends, I often do not plan my meals ahead, but get inspired by what is in season. For example, last weekend I saw that our stall had bunches and bunches of green asparagus for little money. So I bought those and built the following two meals around asparagus.

 

 

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Having said that, I still feel it might be helpful for some people to get an idea of what is in season at the moment;

 

VEGETABLES

Artichoke

Asparagus

Avocado

Beets

Broccoli

Cabbage

Carrots

Cauliflower

Fava Beans

Kale

Mushrooms

Peas

Radishes

Rhubarb

Spinach

Sweet potatoes

Turnips

Courgette 

 

FRUITS

Blood

Oranges

Grapefruit

Kiwi

fruits

Mangoes

Pineapple

Strawberries  

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